Home » Frank, Robert - Thank You - SCALO

Frank, Robert - Thank You - SCALO

€ 34,95

Frank, Robert - Thank You - SCALO

€ 34,95
  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Scalo; Gift edition (28 Oct. 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 3931141276
  • ISBN-13: 978-3931141271
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 0.6 x 21.6 cm
  • New in plastic!

Berlin/New York: Scalo, 1998. Collection of Frank's photographs along with the many thank you cards and letters he has received from fans and admirers of his work. "I have saved these cards over many years i was touched how many people wanted to tell me their appreciation of what i was doing without asking anything in return. this small book is my way of saying thank you."  Laid in is a nice foldover announcement for a recent exhibition of his from 2012

Robert Frank Thank You is a reproduction of post cards people sent him expressing" ..their appreciation of what I was doing without asking anything in return..." It includes cards from: Jack Kerouac, Gary Hill, Keith Smith, Allen Ginsberg, Ralph Gibson, Peter Orlovsky, Walker Evans, Jim Goldberg and many others. 76 pages, paper with stiff cover. Color and black and white reproductions. 

Robert Frank began studying photography in 1941 and spent the next six years working for commercial photography and graphic design studios in Zurich, Geneva, and Basel. In 1947 he traveled to the United States, where Alexey Brodovitch hired him to make fashion photographs at Harper's Bazaar. Although a few magazines accepted Frank's unconventional use of the 35-millimeter Leica for fashion work, he disliked the limitations of fashion photography and resigned a few months after he was hired. Between 1950 and 1955 he worked freelance producing photojournalism and advertising photographs for LIFE, Look, Charm, Vogue, and others. He also garnered support for his independently produced street photographs from important figures in the New York art world, including Edward Steichen, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, and Walker Evans, who became an important American advocate of Frank's photography. It was Evans who suggested that he apply for the Guggenheim Fellowship that freed him to travel throughout the country in 1955 and 1956 and make the photographs that would result in his most famous book, The Americans, first published in France as Les Américains in 1957. After its publication in America in 1959, he devoted an increasing amount of time to making films, including Pull My Daisy and Cocksucker Blues, both of which exemplify avant-garde filmmaking of the era. Since 1970, Frank has divided his time between Nova Scotia and New York; he continues to produce still photographs in addition to films.
The Americans was one of the most revolutionary volumes in the history of photography, and it was a source of controversy when it was published in the United States. Frank's cutting perspective on American culture, combined with his carefree attitude toward traditional photographic technique, shocked most Americans who saw it at the time. During the next decade, however, these qualities of his photography became touchstones for a new generation of American photographers; indeed, Frank's work continues to shape contemporary photography.
Lisa Hostetler